Table of Contents

Notes on Revelation

Iyyar/Sivan, 5763
(May/June, 2003)


...[the second] half of Nisan, Iyar, and [the first] half of Sivan is the period of harvests...
(Talmud - Mas. Baba Metzia 106b)

(Please keep in mind that Jewish dates begin on the evening before.
This is a work in progress and will be updated as needed.
Very simple grid of May and June suitable for printing.)

Iyyar, 5763 (May, 2003)

1 Sivan (June 1, 2003) Rosh Chodesh Sivan/New Moon for month of Sivan

2 Sivan (June 2, 2003) Yom HaMeyuchas/Day of the Noble
2 Sivan, 5763 (June 2, 2003) Bush to Egypt for Arab Summit

3,4,5 Sivan (June 3,4,5, 2003) Shloshes Yemei Hagbalah/Three Days of Limitation
4 Sivan, 5763 (June 4, 2003) Bush, Sharon, Abbas "Peace" Summit in Jordan
5 Sivan, 5763 (June 5, 2003) Last living signatory of Israel's Declaration of Independence dies

June 3, 1922 British White Paper (please see 6,7 Sivan)

June 5, 1967 Start of Six Day War

6,7 Sivan (June 6,7, 2003) Shavuot/Pentecost (6th Israel, 6th and 7th Diaspora)
7 Sivan (June 7, 1922) British White Paper

7,8 Sivan (June 7,8, 2003) Isru Chag/Bind the Festival (7th for Israel, on the 8th for Diaspora)
8 Sivan, 5763 (June 8, 2003) US Observers to Israel (Wolf sent to guard sheep?)

9 Sivan, 5763 (June 9, 2003) Pluto at Opposition


1 Sivan (June 1, 2003) Rosh Chodesh Sivan/New Moon


2 Sivan (June 2, 2003) Yom HaMeyuchas/Day of the Noble

After the exodus, on the 1st of Sivan, G-d instructed Moses to tell the nation, "You shall be a kingdom of ministers and a holy nation." On the 2nd of Sivan, Moses delivered this message and charged Israel with its new noble status. And so that day is called Yom HaMeyuchas, "Day of the Noble." (Mesorah Heritage Foundation)

2 Sivan (June 2, 2003) Bush to Egypt for Arab Summit

  1. 02 Jun 2003 17:39:09 GMT Bush arrives in Egypt on Middle East peace mission

    SHARM EL-SHEIKH, Egypt, June 2 (Reuters) - U.S. President George W. Bush arrived in Egypt on Monday for a summit with Arab leaders to seek their support for the U.S-backed "road map" intended to end the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

    Bush, on his first presidential visit to the Middle East, will meet leaders from Egypt, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and Jordan, as well as the Palestinian prime minister Mahmoud Abbas, in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh on Tuesday.

    After talks in Egypt, Bush will travel to a landmark summit with Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and his Palestinian counterpart Mahmoud Abbas.

    (http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L0281098.htm)

  2. Saudis: Bush accepted linking normalization to right of return

    Saudi Sources: Normalization With Israel Issue Caused 24-Hour Crisis With US GMP20030605000055 London Al-Sharq al-Awsat in Arabic 05 Jun 03 p1 [Report by Abd-al-Latif al-Minawi in Sharm al-Shaykh: "Twenty Four Crisis Between Saudi Arabia and United States Almost Caused Prince Abdallah's Withdrawal From Sharm al-Shaykh"]

    [With thanks to www.mideastweb.org/mewnews1.htm ]

    [FBIS Translated Text] Informed sources have revealed that relations between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United States went through a 24-hour crisis at the Sharm al-Shaykh summit that almost caused Saudi Crown Prince Abdallah Bin-Abd-al-Aziz to pull out from the summit's closing session.

    The sources said US President George Bush resolved the problem that revolved around a paragraph on normalization with Israel that was included in the proposed final statement. They added that the US President asserted his positive position and told his aides to delete the paragraph causing the dispute and said he was willing to go personally to Prince Abdallah to persuade him to attend.

    Sources in the Saudi delegation said they appreciate the US President's position and understanding of the crown prince's view.

    The crisis revolved around a paragraph that the US delegation included and which declared the summit conferees' agreement on normalization as part of what was called confidence-building steps between the Arab and Israeli sides. The US delegation at the negotiations that were held at the ministerial level insisted on not deleting the paragraph. A Saudi source said Prince Abdallah was informed and he in turn insisted on rejecting it and said the Saudi delegation would leave Sharm al-Shaykh if the paragraph was not deleted and therefore would not take part in the final statement.

    Regarding the US delegation's justifications, the source said they considered it necessary for supporting the negotiations later but the Saudi side presented a written document that the Saudi Government had sent last month explaining its position that rejects normalization.

    Saudi Ambassador in Washington Prince Bandar Bin-Sultan handed the document to the White House, which clearly stated the three conditions stipulated at the Beirut summit -- the ending of all the occupation, the refugees' right to return, and Jerusalem as the Palestinians' capital -- after which recognition would be made once these conditions have been met.

    On his part, Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Sa'ud al-Faysal said they [the Arabs] value highly President Bush's position and appreciate his personal commitment to achieving peace.

    [Description of Source: London Al-Sharq al-Awsat in Arabic -- Influential Saudi-owned London daily providing independent coverage of Arab and international issues; editorials reflect official Saudi views on foreign policy]

    IMRA - Independent Media Review and Analysis
    Website: www.imra.org.il

  3. Sharon not invited because Saudis refuse to be in the same room as Israelis.

  4. After summit Arabs declare Arafat still in charge of PA.


3,4,5 Sivan (June 3,4,5, 2003) Shloshes Yemai Hagbalah/Three Days of Limitation

For three days—the 3rd, 4th and 5th of Sivan—Israel stood at the foot of Mount Sinai anticipating the Giving of the Torah on Shavuos. These days are called Shloshes Yemai Hagbalah,"Three Days of Limitation," and are celebrated as quasi-festivals. (Mesorah Heritage Foundation)

4 Sivan, 5763 (June 4, 2003) Bush, Sharon, Abbas "Peace" Summit in Jordan

  1. PM SHARON'S 4.June.2003 AQABA REMARKS

    Israel Government Press Office Wednesday, June 04, 2003

    Israeli Statement (04/06/2003)

    I would like to thank His Majesty King Abdullah for arranging this meeting, and express Israel's appreciation to President Bush for coming here to be with Prime Minister Abbas and me. Thank you.

    As the Prime Minister of Israel, the land which is the cradle of the Jewish people, my paramount responsibility is the security of the people of Israel and of the State of Israel. There can be no compromise with terror and Israel, together with all free nations, will continue fighting terrorism until its final defeat.

    Ultimately, permanent security requires peace and permanent peace can only be obtained through security, and there is now hope of a new opportunity for peace between Israelis and Palestinians.

    Israel, like others, has lent its strong support for President Bush's vision, expressed on June 24, 2002, of two states - Israel and a Palestinian state - living side by side in peace and security. The Government and people of Israel welcome the opportunity to renew direct negotiations according to the steps of the roadmap as adopted by the Israeli government to achieve this vision.

    It is in Israel's interest not to govern the Palestinians but for the Palestinians to govern themselves in their own state. A democratic Palestinian state fully at peace with Israel will promote the long-term security and well-being of Israel as a Jewish state.

    There can be no peace, however, without the abandonment and elimination of terrorism, violence, and incitement. We will work alongside the Palestinians and other states to fight terrorism, violence and incitement of all kinds. As all parties perform their obligations, we will seek to restore normal Palestinian life, improve the humanitarian situation, rebuild trust, and promote progress toward the President's vision. We will act in a manner that respects the dignity as well as the human rights of all people.

    We can also reassure our Palestinian partners that we understand the importance of territorial contiguity in the West Bank, for a viable, Palestinian state. Israeli policy in the territories that are subject to direct negotiations with the Palestinians will reflect this fact.

    We accept the principle that no unilateral actions by any party can prejudge the outcome of our negotiations.

    In regard to the unauthorized outposts, I want to reitirate that Israel is a society governed by the rule of law. Thus, we will immediately begin to remove unauthorized outposts.

    Israel seeks peace with all its Arab neighbors. Israel is prepared to negotiate in good faith wherever there are partners. As normal relations are established, I am confident that they will find in Israel a neighbor and a people committed to comprehensive peace and prosperity for all the peoples of the region.

    Thank you all.

    IMRA - Independent Media Review and Analysis
    Website: www.imra.org.il

  2. SHARON, ABU MAZEN, BUSH SPEAK

    The Aqaba Summit - Sharon, Bush, Abdullah, Abbas - has ended, bringing hope to some, and trepidation to others that once again Israel will pay a heavy price in exchange for nothing. "Today may very well be registered in history as the 'naqba' - the day of catastrophe - for Israel," said MK Dr. Aryeh Eldad (National Union).

    Following morning meetings between Sharon/Bush, Sharon/Abdullah, and Bush/Abbas, the leaders of the three main parties to the current diplomatic process - Bush, Sharon, and Abbas - sat together for the actual summit meeting. Afterwards, each of them delivered their "historic" declarations. Hamas spokesman Mahmoud A-Zahar said later that the declarations made at the summit are "a declaration of war on the Palestinian nation [sic];" see below.

    Prime Minister Ariel Sharon made several points, namely:

    • the importance of security for Israel and an end to terrorism;
    • support for a democratic Palestinian state with territorial contiguity;
    • a step-by-step process of implementation of the Road Map;
    • and his intention to immediately remove 'unauthorized outposts.'

    Excerpts:

    "As the Prime Minister of Israel, the land which is the cradle of the Jewish people, my paramount responsibility is the security of the people of Israel and of the State of Israel. There can be no compromise with terror and Israel, together with all free nations, will continue fighting terrorism until its final defeat. Ultimately, permanent security requires peace and permanent peace can only be obtained through security, and there is now hope of a new opportunity for peace between Israelis and Palestinians.

    "Israel, like others, has lent its strong support for President Bush's vision, expressed on June 24, 2002, of two states - Israel and a Palestinian state - living side by side in peace and security...

    "It is in Israel's interest not to govern the Palestinians, but for the Palestinians to govern themselves in their own state. A democratic Palestinian state fully at peace with Israel will promote the long-term security and well-being of Israel as a Jewish state.

    "There can be no peace, however, without the abandonment and elimination of terrorism, violence, and incitement. We will work alongside the Palestinians and other states to fight terrorism, violence and incitement of all kinds. As all parties perform their obligations, we will seek to restore normal Palestinian life, improve the humanitarian situation, rebuild trust, and promote progress toward the President's vision…

    "We can also reassure our Palestinian partners that we understand the importance of territorial contiguity in the West Bank, for a viable, Palestinian state. Israeli policy in the territories that are subject to direct negotiations with the Palestinians will reflect this fact.

    "We accept the principle that no unilateral actions by any party [ed. note: understood to mean "settlements"] can prejudge the outcome of our negotiations.

    "In regard to the unauthorized outposts, I want to reiterate that Israel is a society governed by the rule of law. Thus, we will immediately begin to remove unauthorized outposts…"

    The PA's Abbas recognized Israel's right to exist, but did not specify "as a Jewish state" - meaning that he did not make any concessions on the 'right of return' of Arab refugees to Israel. He similarly did not promise to dismantle the terrorist infrastructures, but sufficed with a commitment to "end the armed uprising."

    Abbas, who served as treasurer of Fatah and doled out the money for many terrorist attacks over the course of several decades, said that terrorism is "inconsistent with our religious and moral traditions."

    He also equated between Palestinian and Jewish suffering throughout history; said he would "end the militarization of the intifada;" promised to allow weapons only in the hands of those "who are in charge of upholding law and order;" and promised to "act vigorously against incitement and violence and hatred." Excerpts, as published by CNN:

    "…Our goal is two states, Israel and Palestine, living side by side in peace and security. The process is the one of direct negotiations to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and to resolve all the permanent status issues and end the occupation that began in 1967 under which Palestinians have suffered so much. At the same time, we do not ignore the suffering of the Jews throughout history. It is time to bring all this suffering to an end.

    "Just as Israel must meet its responsibilities, we, the Palestinians, will fulfill our obligations for this endeavor to succeed. We are ready to do our part. Let me be very clear: There will be no military solution for this conflict, so we repeat our renunciation and the renunciation of terrorism against the Israelis wherever they might be. Such methods are inconsistent with our religious and moral traditions… We will exert all of our efforts using all our resources to end the militarization of the intifada and we will succeed. The armed intifada must end, and we must use and resort to peaceful means in our quest to end the occupation and the suffering of Palestinians and Israelis.

    "And to establish the Palestinian state, we emphasize our determination to implement our pledges which we have made for our people and the international community, and that is the rule of law, single political authority, weapons only in the hands of those who are in charge of upholding the law and order, and political diversity within the framework of democracy.

    "Our goal is clear and we will implement it firmly and without compromise: a complete end to violence and terrorism...

    "We will also act vigorously against incitement and violence and hatred, whatever their form or forum may be. We will take measures to ensure that there is not incitement emanating from Palestinian institutions. We must also reactivate and invigorate the U.S.-Palestinian-Israeli anti-incitement committee."

    U.S. President George Bush, speaking last, began by saying that America, and he personally, are "strongly committed to Israel's security as a vibrant Jewish state." Bush said that the summit participants all "share a goal: The Holy Land must be shared between the state of Palestine and the state of Israel, living at peace with each and with every nation of the Middle East."

    He then ticked off the responsibilities of each side:

    "I welcome Prime Minister Sharon's pledge to improve the humanitarian situation in the Palestinian areas and to begin removing unauthorized outposts immediately. I appreciate his gestures of reconciliation on behalf of prisoners and their families, and his fine statements about the need for territorial contiguity.

    "As I said yesterday, the issue of settlements must be addressed for peace to be achieved. In addition, Prime Minister Sharon has stated that no unilateral actions by either side can or should prejudge the outcome of future negotiations. The prime minister also recognizes that it is in Israel's own interest for Palestinians to govern themselves in their own state…

    "Prime Minister Abbas… has pledged to consolidate Palestinian institutions, including the security forces, and to make them more accountable and more democratic. He has promised his full efforts and resources to end the armed intifada. He has promised to work without compromise for a complete end of violence and terror… Both prime ministers here agree that progress toward peace also requires an end to violence and the elimination of all forms of hatred, and prejudice and official incitement, in school books, in broadcasts and in the words used by political leaders. Both leaders understand that a future of peace cannot be founded on hatred and falsehood and bitterness.

    "…My government will provide training and support for a new, restructured Palestinian security service. And we'll place a mission on the ground, led by Ambassador John Wolf. This mission will be charged with helping the parties to move toward peace, monitoring their progress and stating clearly who is fulfilling their responsibilities…

    "I've also asked Secretary of State Colin Powell and National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice to make this cause a matter of the highest priority. Secretary Powell and Dr. Rice, as my personal representative, will work closely with the parties, helping them move toward true peace as quickly as possible…"

    Arutz Sheva News Service
    http://www.IsraelNationalNews.com
    Wednesday, June 4, 2003 / Sivan 4, 5763

  3. Israeli flags in Palace - Not Aqaba Streets

    Aaron Lerner Date: 4 June 2003

    While Israel Radio reported that while the streets of Aqaba are decorated today with the flags of Jordan, U.S. and the PLO/PA, Jordan declined to put Israeli flags in the streets.

    Amir Weiss, the spokesman of the Israeli Embassy in Amman, took an upbeat tone in an interview on Israel Radio, noting that Israeli flags were inside the king's palace in Aqaba for the meeting.

    At 9:47 AM Israel Radio pointed out it is becoming embarrassing that the Jordanians have yet to permit the Israeli flag to be displayed at the press center.

    IMRA - Independent Media Review and Analysis
    Website: www.imra.org.il

  4. THE END OF SECULAR ZIONISM

    The Yesha Rabbis Council issued a strong statement last night, following the Aqaba summit, saying that "secular Zionism has completed its task, and it is now the turn of 'believing Zionism' to take over." The Council also criticized the General Security Service for its warning that Yesha residents might fire on security forces who come to evacuate them. "Do they have 'thought police?'" asked the Council.

    Arutz Sheva News Service
    http://www.IsraelNationalNews.com
    Thursday, June 5, 2003 / Sivan 5, 5763

5 Sivan, 5763 (June 5, 2003) Last living signatory of Israel's Declaration of Independence dies

Meir Vilner dies at 84

By Joseph Algazy

Meir Vilner, the last living signatory of Israel's Declaration of Independence, died Thursday morning at the age of 84. Vilner served as leader of the Israeli Communist Party (and subsequently Hadash) and was its representative in the Knesset for some 40 years.

Born in Vilnius in 1918, Vilner studied at the Hebrew gymnasium Tarbut. In his youth, he was a member of the Hashomer Ha'tzair movement. In 1938, he immigrated to Israel to study at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. In 1940, he joined the communist party in Israel, which was underground, and for many years was a member of the party leadership. From 1965-1990, he served as secretary-general of the Israel Communist Party and was its chairman from 1990-1993.

In a statement released Thursday, his family said Vilner saw his work as his greatest achievement, through which he and his colleagues successfully created a unique political movement in which they lived and fought, Jews and Arabs together, for a just peace, for equal rights for the Arab population and for the defense of workers' rights in Israel.

Vilner championed a Marxist-Leninist ideology, to which he remained true throughout the upheavals that shook the world in recent years. He maintained his political ideology even when it was deemed unacceptable and not easily discussed in Israel.

In 1967, Vilner survived an assassination attempt by a member of Herut - a right-wing political movement that evolved into today's Likud party. He was stabbed at the height of an incitement campaign that targeted Vilner and his political party for their call to end the occupation and recognize the Palestinian right to a homeland alongside Israel.

He died in hospital, where he had spent the last four years.

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=301031&contrassID=2&subContrassID=1&sbSubContrassID=0&listSrc=Y)


June 5, 1967 Start of Six Day War

XI. THE SIX-DAY WAR

INTRODUCTION

On 15 May 1967, Israel celebrated its 19th Day of Independence. The celebrations were attuned to a minor key. The economy had not yet recovered from a recession that had afflicted it the year before. Tension on the border with Syria had risen incessantly, sabotage was being committed in Israel's territory by terrorists from across the lines, settlements were being shelled by Syrian guns entrenched on the Golan Heights. The Soviet press waged a propaganda campaign against Israel, accusing it of aggressive designs against Syria.

During the Independence Day parade in Jerusalem, Israel's Government heard from the Chief of Staff the first news of large Egyptian troop movements, begun the previous day, in the direction of the Suez Canal and the Sinai peninsula (Document 1). There was, at first, an inclination to believe that the movements were no more than a propagandistic show. Egypt's fortunes at that time were at a low ebb. It was still entangled in the Yemen war, with little success, and consequently suffered from loss of prestige. Its relations with some of its Arab sister-States had deteriorated, those with Saudi Arabia were near the breaking point, those with Tunisia and Morocco strained, Jordan was considered an enemy (in a speech on 1 May Nasser had called King Hussein an 'agent and slave of the imperialists'). Syria indicted Egypt as not living up to its obligations as an ally. The Israelis did not yet know that the Soviet Union was urging Egypt to take an active stand alongside Syria against what was described as an impending Israeli aggression against Syria. On 13 May a Soviet parliamentary delegation visited Cairo and informed the Egyptian leaders that Israel had concentrated eleven to thirteen brigades along the Syrian border in preparation for an assault within a few days, with the intention of overthrowing the revolutionary Syrian Government. Similar information may have been given to Egypt by the Soviets somewhat earlier. There was, of course, not a grain of truth in the story, as the Soviets knew very well. The Egyptians were in a position to know it, too, in view of the authoritative denial issued by Secretary-General U Thant a few days afterwards. Later, U Thant reported that UNTSO observers "have verified the absence of troop concentrations and absence of noteworthy military movements on both sides of the [Syrian] line". But Nasser probably understood the Soviet information as a hint that the Soviet Union was persuaded that timing and circumstances were propitious for an assault on Israel, and obviously felt obliged to abandon the cautious policy that he had till then pursued and assume the leadership of the Arab campaign.

If Israel's leaders still told themselves on 15 May that there was no imminent danger of war, they were soon to be undeceived. On 16 May Radio Cairo declared: "The existence of Israel has continued too long. We welcome the Israeli aggression we welcome the battle we have long awaited. The peak hour has come. The battle has come in which we shall destroy Israel." On that day, Egypt asked for the withdrawal of the UN Emergency Force from Sinai and the Gaza Strip. U Thant acquiesced on the night of 18-19 May in what many considered unwarranted haste. Israel asserted that his precipitate compliance ran contrary to an express undertaking by his predecessor in 1957 (see Section IX, Document 35). UNEF ceased its functions on 19 May (Document 2). On the same day, Israel decided on partial mobilization, but was still hopeful that a dangerous escalation could be averted by stepped-up diplomatic efforts. It was indicative of this state of mind that, also the same day, President Zalman Shazar flew to Canada for a long-planned State visit, and that on 21 May Finland's Premier, Kustun Passio, was welcomed on a State visit to Israel. At the opening of the summer session of the Knesset on 22 May Prime Minister Eshkol emphasized Syrian aggression and incitement and called for a lessening of tension and the preservation of peace (Document 3).

In the meantime, unprecedented military escalation had taken place on the Egyptian border. By 20 May Nasser had massed over 80,000 men and about 900 tanks in Sinai, facing Israel. In the early morning hours of 23 May while U Thant was on his way to Cairo as a peace-maker, the world learned that Nasser had proclaimed the closure of the Straits of Tiran to Israeli and Israel-bound shipping some hours before. He was fully aware that Israel regarded the closure as an act of aggression justifying Israel's invocation of the right of self-defence. It was his declared aim to force Israel into action that would trigger off full-scale war. Speaking to Egyptian trade unionists on 26 May, he declared: "The battle will be a general one and our basic objective will be to destroy Israel" (Document 7). With the UNEF departed, Egypt planned to resume fidayun operations from the Gaza Strip against and into Israel. After more than ten years of repose, Israel's villages in the vicinity of the Egyptian border had, once more, to suffer shelling and mines. War frenzy swept Egypt and almost the entire Arab world. Nasser was at the zenith of his popularity, the hero of battle who would lead the Arabs to victory. On 29 May he delivered a speech proclaiming that he would erase the Arab defeat of 1948 (Document 8). On 30 May, King Hussein of Jordan visited Cairo unexpectedly, committed himself to take part in the war that loomed and placed his forces Under an Egyptian commander, General Riad. Iraq followed suit. During a visit to Moscow, Egypt's War Minister was assured of Soviet support by Prime Minister Kosygin.

On 24 May, the Security Council met, at the insistence of Canada and Denmark, to discuss the situation in the Middle East. The representatives of the Soviet Union and Bulgaria maintained that there was no reason for a discussion. After fruitless talks, the Council adjourned on 3 June; it had reached no decision (Document 10).

Foreign Minister Eban left Jerusalem on 24 May for Paris, London and Washington, to alert the Western leaders to the critical situation and seek of them action in accordance with their declarations ten years earlier, when Israel withdrew its forces from Sharm el-Sheikh and the Gaza Strip. In Paris, Eban found a completely changed situation. President de Gaulle suggested that the Big Four should work together for a de-escalation of the tension and decide on a solution to the questions of navigation through the Straits, the problem of the Arab refugees and the "conditions of proximity of the interested States". He urged that Israel should not be the first to open fire. Eban's protestations that Egypt had already started aggression were in vain. A statement in similar terms to the utterances of de Gaulle was issued on 2 June by the Council of Ministers of France (Document 11), and, on the following day, by the French representative in the Security Council (Document 10). It became apparent that France, which only three years earlier had hailed Israel as "friend and ally", had switched sides. On 3 June, it imposed an arms embargo on the Middle East, but in reality only Israel was affected.

President Lyndon Johnson and Prime Minister Harold Wilson assured the Israeli Foreign Minister of their support for free passage through the Straits of Tiran and the Gulf of Aqaba, but added that they needed some time to enlist the participation of other States and to assure the necessary approval by Congress and Parliament. The Foreign Minister returned to Jerusalem on the evening of 27 May. After a long and anxious session, the Government decided to give further chances to diplomatic efforts to prevent war. But, within a few more days, it was considered that there were no chances of resolving the crisis by international action. While a sympathetic but passive world watched Israel in its most perilous hour, Israel finished mobilization and prepared for the worst eventuality. On I June, the two major opposition parties, Gahal and Rafi, joined the Government coalition in a Government of National Unity. Lieutenant-General Moshe. Dayan (Rafi), Chief of Staff during the Sinai campaign, replaced Levi Eshkol as Minister of Defence, and Gahal leaders Menachem Begin and Yosef Sapir became Ministers without portfolio. On 4 June, the Cabinet authorized the Prime Minister and the Minister of Defence to decide on appropriate steps to defend the State (Document 12).

On the following morning, 5 June, the Israel Air Force attacked Arab air forces and airfields and destroyed 400 enemy aircraft in Egypt, Syria, Jordan and Iraq, most of them on the ground. The Egyptian air force was virtually destroyed in a lightning action lasting less than three hours. At the same time, the Israel Defence Forces moved against the Egyptian columns massed in Sinai. The Southern Command, composed of three divisions, faced seven Egyptian divisions and about 1,000 Egyptian tanks. In four days of battle, including one of the largest battles in the history of armoured warfare, Israel occupied the entire Sinai peninsula and the Gaza Strip, reached the eastern bank of the Suez Canal and opened the Straits of Tiran. On 8 June, Egypt accepted a cease-fire and, that evening, fighting ceased in Sinai.

On the morning of 5 June, Prime Minister Eshkol had, through the Chief of Staff of UNTSO, General Odd Bull, despatched a message to King Hussein of Jordan, urging him to refrain from joining the war (Document 16). The message was not answered, but, in the later hours of the forenoon, Jordan opened fire along the entire armistice line with Israel, shelling Jerusalem with especial violence. At noon, Jordanian soldiers occupied the United Nations headquarters. In the afternoon, Israel opened its counterattack, and two days later, after swift fighting, had taken the Old City of Jerusalem and the entire West Bank. On the evening of 7 June, Jordan accepted the cease-fire and fighting stopped.

Syria had taken part in the fighting with planes and artillery, continuously shelling Israeli villages near the border and attacking some of them with infantry and armour. At noon on 9 June, the Israel Defence Forces, now freed from other fronts, attacked the Syrian army entrenched on the Golan Heights. In fierce righting during that and the following day, they stormed the Heights and occupied the town of Kuneitra on the afternoon of 10 June. At 1630 GMT, a cease-fire became effective on the Israel-Syrian front.

The Six-Day War was over. Israel's casualties amounted to 759 dead and about 3,000 wounded. Arab casualties came to about 15,000. Israel, delivered from the peril to its very existence, was now determined not to move from the new cease-fire lines until permanent peace was established (Document 23).

The Security Council, inert and ineffectual during the emergency that preceded the war, had met each day of the fighting, its main concern to arrange a cease-fire (Documents 20, 21, 22). On 13 June, the Soviet Union having broken off diplomatic relations with Israel three days previously, followed by Bulgaria, Poland, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Guinea, asked that a special emergency session of the General Assembly be convened. The Assembly was addressed on 19 June by Soviet Premier Kosygin, who called for condemnation of Israel, withdrawal of its forces from all areas occupied in the war, and payment of compensation by Israel for damage inflicted on Egypt, Syria and Jordan (Document 24). His address was answered by Israel's Foreign Minister (Document 25). The discussion in the Assembly then centred on a number of draft Resolutions (Documents 27-30) and lasted for a month. On 21 July, the session adjourned: the Assembly had decided nothing and referred the issue back to the Security Council. The Council, after long discussions, on 22 November unanimously adopted Resolution 242, which became the basis for future United Nations policymaking on the Middle East conflict (Document 32).

The Arab States did not listen to Israel's call for peace. Encouraged by the Soviet Union, which embarked on the rebuilding of their shattered armies, they resolved, at a summit meeting in Khartoum between 29 August and 1 September, upon a policy of three nays: no peace with Israel, no recognition of Israel, no negotiations with Israel (Document 31). Israel advocated direct negotiations between the parties, without prior conditions, aimed at the conclusion of binding peace agreements. Until peace was made, the Israel Defence Forces would be deployed on the new cease-fire lines, and the areas occupied in the Six-Day War would be administered by an Israeli Military Government. Jerusalem was reunified at the end of June, and the whole city was thus brought under Israeli law (see Section IV).

(http://www.israel-mfa.gov.il/mfa/go.asp?MFAH0dy70)


6,7 Sivan (June 6,7, 2003) Shavuot/Pentecost (6th Israel, 6th and 7th Diaspora).

  1. Anniversary of the Revelation at Sinai (please see Shavuot/Pentecost 1 and Shavuot/Pentecost 2 files)

  2. Shavuot is compared to a wedding, for it was on Shavout that the covenant between God and the Jewish people was sealed at Mount Sinai. Book of Ruth is read in the synagogue.

  3. Traditionally, Shavuot is the day that Enoch was born, and translated.
    Traditionally, Shavuot is the day that King David was born, and died.

  4. The night of Shavuot is one of the most solemn occasions in the Jewish year for orthodox Jews. The whole night is spent in the Synagogue preparing for the Day of Revelation. Children believe that if they can stay up till midnight and keep awake, the heavens will open for an instant and all the wishes of their hearts will be fulfilled, if they make their wish at exactly the correct moment. A special service is recited, called "Tikkun Chatzot," – "The Midnight Service," or "Tikkun Leyl Shavuot," – "The Shavuot Night Service," which is a sort of summary of the whole of the written and oral law, Chumash, Prophets and Writings, Mishna, Talmud and "Zohar." The beginning and end of each section are read, and there is also a Special version of the 613 Commandments called "Azharot," - "Warnings" or "Injunctions". (Shavuot Prologue)

    The Midrash says that the people slept on the night before the giving of the Torah and Hashem had to wake them up in the morning. To rectify this, they stay up all night in anticipation.

7 Sivan (June 3, 1922) British White Paper

The first official manifesto interpreting the Balfour Declaration, it was issued on June 3, 1922, after the 1921 disturbances. Although the White Paper stated that the Balfour Declaration could not be amended and that the Jews were in Palestine by right, it reduced the area of the Mandate by excluding the area east of the Jordan River, which was given to the Emir Abdullah. This document also established the principle of "economic absorptive capacity" as a factor for determining the immigration quota of Jews to Palestine. (White Papers)


7,8 Sivan (June 7,8, 2003) Isru Chag/Bind the Festival (on the 7th for Israel, on the 8th for Diaspora)

The day following the three pilgrim festivals (Pesach, Shavuot and Sukkot) is known as Isru Chag (bind the festival), with reference to Tehillim 118:27. It is observed as a semi-festive day, when the Tachanun supplications are omitted from the Shacharit (morning) and Minchah (afternoon) services. In Temple times, Isru Chag was the day when the pilgrims left Yerushalayim for their homes. According to a talmudic statement, he who observes Isru Chag as a festive day with eating and drinking is as if he offered sacrifices upon the Mizbeach (Altar) (Sukkah 25b)

( http://headcoverings-by-devorah.com/OrachChayim/HebglossI.html)

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Dear Rabbi,
What's the significance of "isru chag" (the day after a festival)? Why is there no school (in Israel, at least) on isru-chag? A friend said it has something to do with the fact that there was an extra day for people to bring a korban (Temple offering) during the festival, in case they couldn't make it to Jerusalem on time. If so, why is this pertinent to our day, when there are no sacrifices?

Dear Michael Braitman,
Ever go jogging? When you're done, you're not supposed to stop suddenly; it's too big of a shock to the system. Rather, you "warm-down" by walking, and finally you can stop.

The same is true of a Festival. We don't go directly from a joyous festival back into everyday life. We need a day to "warm-down," or rather to "wrap-up" the joy of the Holiday. "Isru chag" is that day. "Isru chag" literally means "tie up the festival." That is, take the happiness and meaningfulness of the festival and bring it with you into the rest of the year.

In Temple times, festive offerings were brought on isru chag of the Shavuot Festival. Isru chag remains a semi-festive day, even today when there is no Temple.

Sources:

Shulchan Aruch 429:2
Succah 45b
Jerusalem Talmud, Avodah Zarah 1:5

(Ask the Rabbi)

8 Sivan, 5763 (June 8, 2003) US Observers to Israel (Wolf sent to guard sheep?)

U.S. observers due, as Abbas talks with Hamas leadership

By Aluf Benn, Arnon Regular and Nadav Shragai

A U.S. team, under the leadership of envoy John Wolf, is expected to arrive in the area today or tomorrow to begin observing the implementation of the road map by both the Palestinian Authority and Israel.

The group will include State Department and Central Intelligence Agency officials. Their immediate aim will be to ensure that the PA puts an end to terrorism while Israel keeps its commitment to evacuate illegal outposts in the West Bank.

...

With their declared commitment to the road map, and under the aegis of the United States, the two warring sides - Israel and the Palestinians - embarked at the end of Wednesday's Aqaba summit on efforts to come to terms with opposition forces inside their respective camps.

Late in the week, representatives of Sharon and Mofaz met with leaders of the Yesha Council of Settlements in an effort to jointly form a list of outposts that would be evacuated, some possibly voluntarily by the settlers.

For their part, Palestinian sources close to Abbas said that contacts with the radical Islamic group Hamas were ongoing, despite reports that there was a break in communication as a result of the Palestinian Authority's stance on the road map.

The meetings between Yesha and government representatives were held in spite of the initial reluctance of the settlers to carry out any form of negotiations on the removal of outposts. However, there was concern the Defense Ministry would include in its list of outposts to be removed ones that had been in place for some time, so it was decided to seek terms that would include mostly empty or sparsely populated outposts.

According to reports, Sharon is personally involved in the formation of the list of outposts that will be removed as part of the road map.

Right-wing circles are certain the evacuation of outposts will begin this week. For his part, Mofaz ordered his office to draw up a list of outposts that are blatantly in violation of the law.

In the coming days, Mofaz is scheduled to meet with leaders of the Yesha Council in order to convince them to evacuate 12 outposts considered "marginal." At the Prime Minister's Office and at the Israel Defense Forces it is still hoped that the settlers will agree to dismantle the outposts on their own accord and avoid clashes with the army.

Frustrated Palestinian officials harshly criticized Hamas yesterday, saying the group's decision to pull out of talks aimed at ending attacks against Israelis could torpedo the road map peace plan just as it was getting off the ground. ...

(http://www.haaretz.com)


9 Sivan, 5763 (June 9, 2003) Pluto at Opposition (see Pluto and Chiron/Pluto Conjunction files)

Opposition:
The position of a planet when it is exactly opposite the Sun as seen from Earth. A planet at opposition is at its closest approach to the Earth and is best suitable for observing. (Sea & Sky: Glossary of Astronomy Terms)


Quotes from Talmud taken from The Soncino Talmud CD-ROM, Davka Corp. 1991-1995.
Quotes from Midrash Rabbah taken from The Soncino Midrash Rabbah CD-ROM, Davka Corp. 1992-1995.


Moza

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